Archive for December 6, 2009

Proposal for the replacement of Peabody Estate at the Junction

Author: Cyril Richert

Extract from the Architects Journal illustrating proposals for the replacement Peabody Estate at the Junction:

Hawkins\Brown Architects has designed a 650-home estate for Peabody at Clapham Junction that more than double the capacity of the existing development. The proposal is a test scheme for the housing association‘s future vision, released this week, which was drawn up by Terry Farrell. Every home in the estate will have outside space and be build to exceed level 4 of Code for Sustainable Homes. The scheme will be funded though a combination of social housing grants, the sale of private homes and low-carbon initiative grants.

[click on the image to see it bigger]

According to an article in BDonline,  Hawkins Brown (which won an international competition to reappraise the Peabody Estate’s Clapham site in south London – have you heard about this in Brightside?) is drawing up plans for a £100 million estate regeneration that is being described as a template for the future of social housing.

The firm, has now been given the go-ahead to draw up detailed plans to double the number of homes, enlarge properties and give all residents private, outdoor space.

According to the website, Hawkins Brown director Wayne Glaze said there was a pressing need to reconnect the Clapham estate to its surroundings.

Clapham is a walled estate at the moment,” he said, “and we have tried to open it up to make it easier to navigate. We wanted to make it more part of the community.

The existing 1930s stock is, by its nature, outdated. It is our ambition to give better space standards. The flats are very internal looking. The intention is to provide everyone with some amenity space.

However a criticism on the article wonders how they can achieve private outdoor space and still make the estate open to the surrounding community with the number of flats and even a tower block included.

The tower (which because of the seventy foot tall hill that it sits on) will already be seven stories higher than the ones in Grant Road and is bound to ‘read’ very strongly when looking up St John’s Hill.

There are also concerns on aspects of the overall density – plus uncertainties over sizes of units in terms of room numbers.

It is hoped a planning application will be lodged next year for the three-and-a-half-year project to be carried out in stages.

UPDATE 10/12/2009

As requested in comments below, I provide a comparison of the current estate and the architect view.

Information about Peabody Trust is available on their website.

The properties are currently mostly general needs, apart from two of the blocks which are used for sheltered accommodation and a small number of market rented properties.

The proposal is planning to double the number of new homes (up to 650) and to be funded through a combination of social housing grants and private homes

WBC tall building policy, the Site Specific Allocations Document says (p94):
Buildings should face directly on to the streets with a maximum height of 4 storeys to respect the character and scale of the existing residential buildings. Further west across the site the built form could be more intense of 6 to 8 storeys with taller buildings towards St. John’s Hill.
Applications for buildings of 5 or more storeys will be subject to the criteria of the tall buildings policy […] tall buildings in this location are likely to be inappropriate.

Below are also photos from St John’s Hill and internal open space:

The tower (which because of the seventy foot tall hill that it sits on) will already be seven stories higher than the ones in Grant Road and is bound to ‘read’ very strongly when looking up StJohn’s Hill.

There are aspects of the overall density – plus uncertainties over sizes of units in terms of room numbers – that concern me too somewhat.
Advertisements

December 6, 2009 at 1:54 pm 16 comments


December 2009
M T W T F S S
« Nov   Jan »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Categories

Feeds